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For 11 years I have been researching, photographing and interviewing the subject…

For 11 years I have been researching, photographing and interviewing the subject…


For 11 years I have been researching, photographing and interviewing the subjects of the War Relocation Authority photographers, Dorothea Lange, Clem Albers and Tom Parker were some who documented the forced removal of 120,000 ethnic Japanese Americans, 2/3 who were American citizens from the west coast of the United States during WWII.

Arlene Tatsuno Damron, 70, was born in the Topaz incarceration camp in the Utah desert, one of the 10 Japanese incarceration camps during World War II.
Her father, Dave, returned to his home at 1625 Buchanan St. on January 15, 1945. For eight months, he helped other returning internees find housing and employment. By July 1946, he reestablished the NB department store. She thinks of internment as being in a concentration camp.
“I tend to think of more like Dachau, you know, places where the Holocaust happened,” she said. “We were very fortunate that didn’t happen to Japanese Americans. So I think for me there’s that difference, a big difference.

My traveling exhibition is “Gambatte! Legacy of an Enduring Spirit: Triumphing over Adversity Japanese American WWII Incarceration Reflections, Then and Now”

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