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For 11 years I have been researching, photographing and interviewing the subject…

For 11 years I have been researching, photographing and interviewing the subject…


For 11 years I have been researching, photographing and interviewing the subjects of the War Relocation Authority photographers, Dorothea Lange, Clem Albers and Tom Parker were some who documented the forced removal of 120,000 ethnic Japanese Americans, 2/3 who were American citizens from the west coast of the United States during WWII.
Jane Yanagi Diamond, 75, taught high school and was a school counselor after she graduated from San Diego State. “I taught U.S. history, but I couldn’t talk about the internment,” she said. “My voice would get all strange. I think I’m able to talk better about it now.
“But you know, I was having a hard time being Japanese. Right after the war, we came back and there was tremendous amount of prejudice in the Bay Area. The kids tormented us. My traveling exhibition is “Gambatte! Legacy of an Enduring Spirit: Triumphing over Adversity Japanese American WWII Incarceration Reflections, Then and Now”

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@paulkitagaki
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paulkitagaki
www.kitagakiphoto.com
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#Gambatte!
#executiveorder9066
LegacyofanEnduringSpirit
#JapaneseAmericanIncarceration



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